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In August 8 - 13, 2018, eight youth members of our school participated in the "2nd International Youth Martial Arts Camp" at Chungju, Korea.

These members were:

  1. Ian Ly
  2. Stephanie Ly
  3. Carmen Pan
  4. Aquella Muhammad
  5. Ethan Au Wong
  6. Zoltan Biro
  7. Justin Ly
  8. Andrew Nguyen

Our team was honored to be selected by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), to represent Canada for this event.

The organization is the International Centre of Martial Arts (ICM) for Youth Development and Engagement under the auspices of UNESCO.  ICM is the first and only category 2 centre that specializes in promotion of martial arts from around the world.  They aim to contribute to youth development and engagement with its philosophy and values, positive attitudes, and the personal development characteristic it engenders and ultimately, aim for cultivation of a culture of peace and reconciliation.

Special thanks to Mr. Kim Si Hyun (Secretary General of the ICM), and his team members Mr. Lee Keun Euk (Chief, International Cooperation Team) who had visited our school in May 2018; and Mr. Choi Won (Chief, Research and Development Team) who is in charge of programs and events during the camp.  Without them, this camp will not be successful, and the youth from foreign countries (Bulgaria, Singapore, Malaysia, China, and Canada) along with youth in Korea had a great time.

During the camp, they learnt team building; showcased their martial art from their country; learned martial arts from different countries and styles; played water sports; visited University of Martial Arts to see martial arts demos; site seeing Light World park, Korea ancient Folks village, Martial Art Museum, Palace, and highest tower in Seoul.  Beside, everyone had also enjoyed the famous authentic dishes menu from Korea during the camp "Kim Chi".

On behalf of the Shaolin Kung Fu Centre, I want to thanks all those who participated in the event.  You had made Canada proud by your demos at the opening ceremony, and also especially at the National group demo night.  You had made Canada team the best team over among other countries.  Keep up with your hard work!

Frank Ly
Grandmaster
Shaolin Kung Fu Centre

 

In July 27 -29, 2018 Our school participated in the 6th World Kuo Shu Championship Tournament that took place in Baltimore, Maryland U.S.A.  There were eight members of our school who competed in this event.

Our school brought back excellent results.  Beside several medalists from the school, there is one member (Ian Ly) had been selected for "The World Kuo Shu Hall Of Fame", and got an award plaque.

Below are the results of the medalists competed in their division:

  1. Ian Ly - 1 Gold, 2 Bronze Metals
    1. Gold (Advance youth 13 - 14 years old light contact sparring)
    2. Bronze (Advance youth 13 - 14 years old long weapon "Spear" form)
    3. Bronze (Advance youth 13 - 14 years old other weapon "Butterfly sword" form)
  2. Ethan Wong - 3 Gold Metals
    1. Gold (Intermediate 11 - 12 years old hand form)
    2. Gold (Intermediate 11 - 12 years old long/short "staff" weapon form)
    3. Gold (Intermediate 11 - 12 years old other weapon "Butterfly sword" form)
  3. Alexander Cabral - I Gold and 1 Silver Metal
    1. Gold (Intermediate adult light contact sparring)
    2. Silver (Intermediate adult long/short "Broadsword" weapon form)
  4. William Haslam - 1 Silver Metal
    1. Silver (Intermediate 13- 14 years old light contact sparring)

Congratulation to all medalists!  Keep up the hard work.

There is nothing more fun than doing kung fu summer camp.


Shaolin Kung Fu Centre’s summer day camp will get your kids off the couch and out of the house so they can have fun, stay fit, and develop their physical and mental capacities in a fun, safe environment.

Develop Coordination, Flexibility, Strength, and Endurance

Coordination and Flexibility

At our kung fu summer day camp your child will improve his or her coordination, balance, and grace. Shaolin kung fu emphasizes flexibility more than most sports, as limber muscles translate into speed and power. In our classes, poise is achieved by maintaining proper posture at all times.

Strength and Endurance

We use traditional exercises to develop and maintain the strength needed to support the advanced techniques. As training is pursued, your child will find that he or she can work harder, longer, and with greater ease and enjoyment.

Hone Focus and Improve Learning Skills

Your child will learn to bring all of his/her attention to the activity at hand. Many children do not get this lesson in their daily activities and become easily distracted.

Learning is a skill. Children who work their way through our curriculum are learning to learn. The level of challenge, the individuality of instruction, and the visible results all work to make learning at our school uniquely valuable in the art of learning itself.

Develop Respect and Discipline

Your child will learn the value of respect. Students bow in and out of the school and bow to their teacher and senior students as a sign of respect. In return, they are shown respect by the teacher and other students at all levels. Students also learn to respect themselves.

At the Shaolin Kung Fu Centre children also learn physical and mental discipline. Along with physical training the children are encouraged to be compassionate towards their peers and pay attention to their instructors. They interact with other students and instructors who push themselves to achieve greater mastery in the art of Shaolin kung fu.

Make Friends and Improve Social Skills

It can be difficult for kids to go to a summer camp where they don't know anyone. We make it easy for your child to find friends fast. A camp friendship may last a lifetime, or only a summer, but either way our day camp offers your child the opportunity to branch out from their regular circle of friends and learn to connect with other people in positive ways.

Day Camp Curriculum

Your child will learn basic kung fu drills, and a lot of stretching and strength training to enhance the flexibility.  For those who are interested to attend the 2018 U.S. International Kung Fu Championship Tournament (July 28th, and 29th), our Instructor will work on those forms that his/her plan to compete with at his/her level. Beside, we use martial arts games to improve their coordination, balance, and endurance.

Day Camp Location and Schedule

The day camp is held at our school located at:

1884 Merivale Road, Unit 17

Ottawa, Ontario

K2G 1E6

For inquiries contact us at:

Via email: info@shaolincentre.com

By phone: 613-291-5227

Pricing

Week 1:

Tuesday July 3rd to Friday July 6th, 2018 Price ($200.00)

Week 2:

Monday July 9th to Friday July 13th, 2018 Price ($250.00)

Activities starts from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Early drop off and late pickup is available upon request.

Early bird - register before April 1st, 2018 to save $15.

Register more than one child in the same household and save $10 per child.

Camp registration will be closed on April 30th, 2018.

Camps are conditional upon sufficient enrollment and are subject to cancellation or transfer to alternate week.

Your child is guaranteed to have fun. Register now as spaces are limited.

A uniform is not mandatory but always recommended so your child will feel like part of the kung fu team.

There are 8 members from our school competed at 2017 U.S. International Kuo Shu Championship Tournament.  They won total of 19 medals back.

Congratulation to Alex (2 gold, 1 bronze), Ryan (2 gold, 1 silver), Ian (3 gold), Ethan (3 gold, 1 bronze), William (1 gold, 1 bronze), Carmen (1 gold, 1 bronze), Stephanie (1 silver), Justin (1 bronze).

Keep it up team!

On Saturday June 2nd, 2018, the school will hold its 19th anniversary celebration. The time will be from 3:00 pm - 7:30 pm.

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Chinese Martial arts, forged by the richness of the ancient Chinese civilization.

Chinese martial arts, specially those of Northern styles was forged by the richness of the ancient Chinese civilization that was birthed in the region of the middle and downstream of the yellow River.

Northern styles are elegant and confident.

Northern styles are popular in the northern part of China and most of them have the characteristics of being elegant and confident, emphasizing movements with coordination and completeness, stylishness and power, clarity and rhythm, and strength and fluidity.

Southern Fist and Northern Kick

Other than Cha Chuan, Hua (flower) Chuan, Pao Chuan, Hong Chuan, Hoa Chuan and other Long fist styles, Northern styles of Chinese Martial Arts also include Ba Chi Chuan (Eight Extremes Fist), Tong Bei, Fanzi Chuan, Praying Mantis, Mian Chuan and Mui Fa (Plum Flower) Chuan, etc., each with its own unique characteristics.  Shaolin Style has its own uniqueness in comparison to northern style, which are distinguished by the characteristics of "Southern Fist and Northern Kick".

Fanzi Chuan - Eight Shan Fan

Fanzi Chuan originally called Eight Sha Fa is a Chinese Martial Art style that has eight main techniques. Shan refers to the swiftness of movements that are like lightning. Fan refers to the movements being executed one after another in succession.

Emphasises the sharpness, swiftness, power and recoiling of the movements

The Fanzi Chuan forms are usually short and concise.  They are swift and foreceful with fist attacking as dense as a heavy rain, low stance moving like a flash, and movements executed in non-stop succession.  Therefore, it also has a nickname "One Whip Fanzi".  Fanzi Chuan emphasizes the sharpness, swiftness, power and recoiling of the movements.

Chinese Martial Arts Praying Mantis

Chinese Martial Arts Praying Mantis Fist belongs to the family of animal imitating styles.  It is said that this Chinese Martial Arts style was founded by Wang Lang from Jimo, Shandong Province who lived during the end of the Ming to the beginning of the Qing Dynasty.

First spread in Jiaodong area in Shandong province

It was said that he was inspired by the techniques that a mantis uses to pray on a cicada and created this particular Chinese Martial Arts style.  Chinese Martial Arts Praying Mantis Style was first spread in Jiaodong - Shandong province and was later developed into Plum Flower, Seven Star, Six Harmony.

Other Chinese Martial Arts Praying Mantis styles such as Seven Star Mantis Martial Arts, Five Star Mantis Martial Arts, Chinese Martial Arts Wah-Lam Mantis, etc.

Chinese Martial Arts Southern styles generally refer to the martial arts disciplines that are popular in the southern part of China.  The southern martial arts system was developed at the end of the Ming Dynasty and the beginning of Qing Dynasty.  It spread throughout the areas of Guangdong, Guangxi, Fujian, Hunan, Hubei, Sichuan, Jiangxi, Jiangsu, Zhejiang provinces, and Hainan Island.

Southern styles have many varieties.  The styles includes Tiger Style, White Crane Style, Hung Gar, Lau Gar, Choy Gar, Li Car, Mok Gar, Wing Chun, Choy Lee Fut, Buddha Style, Eagle Style, etc.  Although each style has its uniqueness, most styles of Southern Chinese martial arts share the same characteristics of a stable stance, flexible and rich hand forms, and powerful movements.  The high population density and narrow streets in Southern China also have direct influence on the dimensions of Southern Style movements.  Different from the elegant, confident, line-flowing and fully-extended Northern Style movements.  Chinese Southern Style of martial arts movements have relatively smaller dimensions, as manifested by the saying "attacking within the area of the size of a sleeping bull".  Its attacking points are usually on the upper part of the human body, such as the head, neck, chest, waist, arms, etc.

Have you wondered if the fighting techniques your learning is effective in a street fight? Are you practicing martial arts or martial sports? In today's article we will clarify the difference between the two and how to spot the difference in your training.

What is Martial Arts?

Martial arts are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a variety of reasons: as self-defense, military and law enforcement applications; as competition, physical fitness, mental and spiritual development; as well as entertainment and the preservation of a nation's Intangible cultural heritage.

The term of martial art originally referred to the combat systems of Europe

Although the term martial art has become associated with the fighting arts of eastern Asia, it originally referred to the combat systems of Europe as early as the 1550s. The term is derived from Latin, and means "arts of Mars", the Roman god of war. Some authors have argued that fighting arts or fighting systems would be more appropriate on the basis that many martial arts were never "martial" in the sense of being used or created by professional warriors.

Martial arts training aims to strike the opponents at any vital areas

For martial arts training, there are techniques which aim to strike the opponents at any vital areas of the body (head, eyes, neck, solar plex, groin, spine, hand and feet joints, etc...)which could cost serious injury, or death.  The shorter the time to bring the opponent down, the better.  Martial arts training involve a lot of conditioning to strength up the hands and feet, make the bone strong and hard so that it can be use for striking to the opponent at the vital areas.

What is Martial Sports?

Martial sports is gear toward striking non vital areas such as stomach, legs, arm, etc...  Often, martial sports training would not involve conditioning.  Martial sports often focus into hand forms, or weapon forms.  Training without live blade for swords.  Wear all protective gears when sparring.  Training mostly toward how to gain point(s) for competition.  Work in a lot of cardio and stamina, so they can last long for competition.

Can Martial Sports Techniques Be Effective In A Street Fight?

In some odd cases only, but not 100%.  For example, in a street fight, there are no rules, anything goes.  The purpose is to take down each other as soon as possible.  People often grab any object (knife, gun, chair, stick, etc...) and use it to hit the opponent or throw at the opponent(s).

If one only focus in martial sports techniques for their training, they often used to striking the non vital areas of the opponent to gain their points for the match or game, then they would have higher chance to get hurt in a street fight.  Whereas if one mainly focus into martial arts training, he/she will get used to strike the vital areas to bring the opponent down as quick as possible.  They often will have a higher chance to survive in a street fight.

Conclusion

The individual should question themselves, do they want to train martial arts or martial sports.  Both paths are good.  At the end, it boils down to are you living in a rough city or a very peaceful city.  For rough city with big population, you will have a higher chance defense for your life and protect your family.  For peaceful city, will have less chance to use martial arts.

In my opinion, no one would know what or when things could happen.  So practice martial arts techniques as your major, and practice martial sports techniques as your substitution or minor would be better.  Stay healthy and look great is important, but being able to protect your life, and your loves one should be more priority on top of anything else.

 

 

The following are the results for our school from 2015 U.S. International Kuo Shu Championship Tournament held in Baltimore on July 24 - 26, 2015:

  • Stephanie Ly:
    1. Gold medal - Youth girl advance hand form 11 - 12 years old (Yi sub chat kiu sao hand form)
    2. Silver medal - Youth girl advance long/short weapon form 11 - 12 years old (Broadsword weapon)
    3. Silver medal - Youth advance 12 years and under in 2 men weapon set fight (Staff vs. Staff)
  • Ian Ly:
    1. Silver medal - Youth boy advance hand form 9 - 10 years old
    2. Silver medal - Youth boy advance sparring 9 - 10 years old
    3. Silver medal - Youth boy advance long/short weapon 12 years and under (Kwan Dao weapon)
    4. Silver medal - Youth advance 12 years and under in 2 men weapon set fight (Staff vs. Staff)
  • Sabrina Di Chiara:
    1. Gold medal - Youth girl advance long/short weapon form 11 - 12 years old (Spear weapon)
    2. Silver medal - Youth girl advance hand form 11 - 12 years old (Yi sub chat kiu sao hand form)
    3. Bronze medal - Youth intermediate boy/girl 13 - 15 years old in 2 men weapon set fight (Staff vs. Staff)
  • Justin Ly:
    1. Gold medal - Youth boy intermediate sparring 11 - 12 years old
    2. Gold medal - Youth boy intermediate hand form 11 - 12 years old (Yi sub chat kiu sao hand form)
    3. Gold medal - Youth boy intermediate long/short weapon form 11 - 12 years old (Broadsword weapon)
    4. Gold medal - Youth boy intermediate other weapons 12 years and under (Cham Ma Dao weapon)
    5. Silver medal - Youth 12 years and under short weapon sparring
    6. Silver medal - Youth boy intermediate 2 men weapon set fight 12 years and under (Butterfly sword vs. Staff)
    7. Silver medal - Youth 2 men empty hand set
  • Donald Truong:
    1. Gold medal - Youth boy intermediate hand form 13 - 15 years old (Yi sub chat kiu sao)
    2. Gold medal - Youth boy intermediate other weapon form 13 - 15 years old (Nan Dao weapon)
    3. Silver medal - Youth boy intermediate empty hand set 13 - 15 years old
    4. Bronze medal - Youth boy advance sparring 13 - 15 years old
  • Sarah Thebaud:
    1. Gold medal - Youth girl intermediate hand form 13 - 15 years old (Mui Fa Quyen hand form)
    2. Bronze medal - Youth girl intermediate 2 men weapon set 13 - 15 years old (Staff vs. Staff)
  • Arthur Thebaud:
    1. Bronze medal - Youth boy intermediate hand form 13 - 15 years old (Yi sub chat kiu sao hand form)
    2. Bronze medal - Youth boy intermediate other weapons form 13 - 15 years old (Kwan Dao weapon)
  • Alex Moore:
    1. Silver medal - Youth boy intermediate long/short weapon form 11 - 12 years old (Spear weapon)
    2. Silver medal - Youth boy intermediate 2 men weapon set fight 12 years and under (Butterfly sword vs. Staff)
  • Charissa Nguyen:
    1. Bronze medal - Youth girl intermediate hand form 13 - 15 years old (Yi sub chat kiu sao hand form)
  • Anthony Nguyen:
    1. Silver medal - Adult men intermediate hand form (Yi sub chat kiu sao hand form)
    2. Silver medal - Adult men intermediate long weapon (Spear weapon)
    3. Silver medal - Adult men intermediate other weapon (Nan Dao weapon)
    4. Gold medal - Adult 2 men weapon set fight (Spear vs. Yin Chi Pai weapon)
  • Stone Liu:
    1. Gold medal - Youth intermediate long/short weapon 13 - 17 years old (Spear weapon)
    2. Gold medal - Adult 2 men weapon set fight (Spear vs. Yin Chi Pai weapon)
  • Elain Pham:
    1. Gold medal - Adult women intermediate hand form (Yi sub chat kiu sao hand form)
    2. Gold medal - Adult women intermediate long/short weapon form (Spear weapon)

For the total score of all the events in the tournament with other schools, our school came to 3rd place for overall youth form.

Congratulation to all, and especially to Justin Ly who had won the most medals this year!

Proudly designed by Jean Francois Complot, All Rights Reserved Shaolin Kung Fu Centre Ltd. © 2019
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